Faroe Knitting

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After Swimming

After swimming in Faroe Islands you need your woolen underwear, so here is a free pattern for a vest to keep you warm.

Size: Small (Medium) and Large-X-Large
Materials:
150 g 2 ply undyed yarn from Snældan.
Circular needle size 5 mm and crochet hook size 5 mm.

Abbreviations: knit = K, purl = P, stitches = sts, continue = cont

Body

Cast on 100 (120) 140 stitches on circular needles and knit in the round. Work 55 (60) 65 cm ribbing K2, P2.

Cast off 4 sts, work in rib 46 (56) 66 sts, cast off 4 sts, work in rib 46 (56) 66 sts.
Now you have the front, the back and two armholes.

Front

Work 6 cm rib.
Work 16 sts as they show in rib. Cast off for neck  14 (24) 34 sts, work in rib 16 sts. Finish each shoulder separately. On the third row cast off 1 more stitch towards the neck. When the armhole is 20 cm place the sts on a stitch holder.  Finish the other shoulder in the same way.

Back

Work 18 cm rib.
Finish each shoulder separately like you did on the front.

From the wrong side knit the shoulders together using the three needle bind off method.

Crochet around the neck. Sew in the ends.

Now you are ready for a cold swim!

Almost finished the knitting part

The pattern for this sweater is from the book Knitting with Icelandic Wool. It is called Æði.

Instead of the yarn in the pattern, I use Sirri  3-ply Blue C16, White and Light Gray.
I am knitting size XS on needles 8 mm, since it has 109 stitches, and I know this should fit me (Size M) in Sirri yarn. And then size L for the length of sleeves and body.

The Winner

Today I finished the shawl. Yes, most of you guessed right, I was knitting a Faroese shawl.

16 comments came in, so I wrote the numbers 1 to 16 on a paper, cut them out and placed them in a small bowl. Mixed well, covered my eyes and pulled… nr. 3.

Congratulations to Janicke Leckang, you have won the yarn.

Please, send your address to hanne@faroeknitting.com.

And here is the shawl. I will have to knit one more very soon while I still remember how to do it. I used the pattern in the book 215 Shawl Designs by Olivia Joensen. It has the basic shawl pattern in Faroese, Danish and English, but the book is sold out. We are so lucky as to have two copies at the library where I work.

At this point point in the process I almost gave up. there are so many stitches and I kept making mistakes in the lace pattern. Here I am trying to get an overview by using two circular needles.
The yarn is Sirri 2-ply, and the colour is C2

Saint Olav’s Festival

My daughter is wearing her new black blouse with long sleeves for the first time.
My daughters new blouse with long sleeves
And here is her grandmother who knitted the blouse. She’s moving the clasps from the old blouse to the new one. There are always some last minute adjustments.

Jansy’s silver. The silver for the Faroese clothes is very expensive, so often you buy it over a long period time.

On Saint Olav’s Day, the 29th of July, there is a procession of the members of parliament and priests to the church. Almost all of the politicians are in their Faroese costumes.
Prime Minister, politicians and priests on their way to church on Saint Olav's Day

Two Knitted Hats

My daughter has knitted two hats, and I think they turned out so well, that they deserve to be on the blog.
The first one is from an old Fair Isle pattern. It is available for free at Kathleen Taylor’s Dakota Dreams The yarn used is 2-ply Sirri.

The other one is striped. The yarn used is 2-ply Sirri except for the yellow and green. The pattern is from a Danish book Hattedamer by Annette Danielsen.

An Important part of the Woman’s National Dress

From an exhibition of handicrafts in Tilhaldið in Tórshavn, a center for retirees, where one of their many activities is knitting

A very important part of the woman’s national costume is the knitted blouse. Although it is very traditional, it has changed through times, according to how the young girls wish for their costume to look. Changes are made to the colours and patterns of the blouse, as well as to the length of the sleeves. Not many years ago, most blouses were in stranded knitting in the colours red and black or dark blue, and the sleeves were short.

The black blouse with long sleeves belongs to my daughter. Her grandmother made ​​it according to her wishes. Plain blouses with long sleeves are seen more and more. The short sleeves are cold if you mostly wear your dress outdoors.

The red blouse is knitted in a traditional Scandinavian pattern. In Faroese it is called “rokkarnir”, the spinning wheels. Very nice finish with a braided edge.


The blue blouse is knitted in a traditional Faroese pattern for the woman’s blouse, and the edges are in black velvet.