Faroe Knitting

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Yellow Lichens

One of my plans for future projects is to dye my own yarn. I have never tried it before, but I know you can dye with lichen, so when I saw this stone I couldn’t help wondering which colour the yarn would get, if you used the lichen for dye.


Has anyone tried to dye with lichen? Which colour did you get? Is it very tricky? Please let me know :)

I suspect it is much easier to dye with plants, but one thing is for sure: It is very practical that the yarns from Snældan and Sirri are in hanks if you want to experiment with dyeing.

This is the area where i found the stones in the northern end of the island Nólsoy.

Northern end of the island Nólsoy

This is what Nólsoy looked like from Tórshavn this morning, when the sun was rising.
I have bought a house in Nólsoy, so very soon Faroe Knitting will move to this very special place.
If you are following me on instagram and have been wondering, why I am in Nólsoy most of the time, this is why :)

Nólsoy in sunrise

One more from Nólsoy a summerday in July.




Do you wash your yarn before knitting?

Many of my knitting friends always wash their yarn before knitting, to make sure the finished object will not change in shape after knitting it.

Yesterday I placed 4 hanks in a mesh bag, the one I usually use for my bras, and popped it in the washing machine on the wool programme using a special soap for wool. Don’t use your ordinary detergent with enzymes, as the wool will get ruined.

Here they are, 4 hanks of dark grey Snældan Skipstroyggjutógv, almost dry. I will not wind them into balls until I am sure they are totally dry.

Snældan Skipstroyggjutógv


Visiting Puffin Land on Mykines

We spent the day on Mykines, the best island for puffin watching.
Not far from Mykines village, you meet the first puffins.

View of the village.

And here comes the fun part. It’s pretty steep, so don’t go if you are afraid of hights.


All the holes are puffin’s nests, and the puffins are everywhere. It’s called Lundaland, which I would translate to Puffin Land, but the dictionary says: Lundaland: [(steep) grass-grown area facing the sea which puffins inhabit; nesting site].

To get to Mykineshólmur where the lighthouse (our goal) is situated, you have to cross the Atlantic Bridge.



And we have reached the lighthouse.


Resting. Notice the puffins :-)

Back in the village, there is plenty of time before the boat comes back, so here is a view from the other side.

And more puffins, just because they are adorable.

Lots of information about Mykines on this site: Mykines.info.
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A Few Photos from the Knitting Festival

The Knitting Festival took place in Fuglafjørður and, as you can see, it was very snowy and cold.


Faroese boats from the Boat Museum in Fuglafjørður.
Faroese Boats

I attended a workshop where we cut our own t-shirt yarn and knitted lampshades.
DIY t-shirt yarn

T-shirt Yarn

No pattern, you just stretch it well and start over if it’s too big or too small.
Knitting a Lampshade

Home again I am trying to finish the lampshade. Gandalf seems to think it’s for him.

And here is the finished result. I can’t wait to see it with light inside.
Knitted Lampshade

Snowy Hike

Photos from today’s hike from Vestmanna to Kvívík.


Sun, snow and calm, what more can you ask for?


Hare tracks in the snow.

Hare tracks in the snow

This hike was arranged by The Hiking Association in Tórshavn, where I am a member.

Every other Sunday in the winter months, and every Sunday in the summer, they arrange tours around the islands.


And now I feel tired and happy.


Maybe I should knit something.

Two Popular Faroese Knitting Books

215 Shawl Designs by Olivia Joensen was sold out for years, but now it’s back!
It has  written instructions for the Faroese shawl in three languages: Faroese, English and Danish. Also instructions for how to line the shawl, and a fine schematic drawing of the shawl.
As the title says there are 215 charts for different borders.
Buy the shawl book from the old bookstore in Tórshavn here.

215 Shawl Designs

Føroysk bindingarmynstur. This is a collection of more than one hundred traditional Faroese knitting charts.
The first edition of this book was published in 1932. I have the 4th edition from 2008, and you can still buy it from the old bookstore in Tórshavn here.

Føroysk bindingarmynstur


Fall Cleaning

The last skeins of the three fall colours in 3-ply are now for sale in the shop at 55 DKK per skein. This is a last chance offer since they are out of production and I only have a few left.


C22 Autumn Green.
C24 Curry.
C25 Burnt Orange.
Find them in the shop.

All of the Snældan yarns in natural colours are now 50 DKK per skein, and the coloured are 30 DKK per skein.

Shipping is flat rate of  65 DKK to Europe and 150 DKK to America, Africa, Asia and Pacific. And remember sales over or equal to 1,000 DKK will receive free shipping.

Take a look at this amazing red mushroom I found in the plantation here in Tórshavn. It looks like something out of a fairy tale.

Red Mushroom

Yarn Weights

When I get questions about yarn weights, I always feel a bit lost since we don’t group yarns this way. Now I stumbled on to this guide on craftsy.com to determine your yarns. I have tried the method on the yarns from Sirri and Snældan, and here is the result.

WPI is Wraps Per Inch, and as you can see I wrapped the yarn around a pencil.


Sirri 3-ply: 12 WPI = DK (Doubble Knitting)
Sirri 2-ply: 20 WPI = Fingering
Sirri 1-ply: 30 WPI = Lace

Snældan 5-ply: 10 WPI = Worsted
Snældan 3-ply: 17 WPI = Sport
Snældan 2-ply: 22 WPI = Fingering
Snældan 1-ply: 36 WPI = Lace

At least this should make it very clear, that 3-ply Sirri is not the same weight as 3-ply Snældan.

There are of course different terms from country to country, so here is a link to Yarn Weigth Terms to help find the right terms and which needles to use.

Hope this was helpful, and comments are always welcome :)


Finding the Right Colours

Or how I went from this…

Planning the colours

Lavender C9, Coral C18, White 10, Light Blue C7, Purple C10 Light Brown 31

… to this


Aftur Sweater

One of my friends knitted a sweater in lots of Sirri colours, where especially the Light Blue C7 and the Coral C18 looked great together. Since then I have wanted to knit something with those two colours in it. So when I started out with the Icelandic Aftur pattern I thought now I had my chance. I started out with Light Brown and knitted the body and the sleeves. The colours don’t start until you have joined body and sleeves for the yoke.
I started out with my darkest colour, Purple C10, but when I had come as far as in this next photo I didn’t like it, and found it was a big mistake with the Light Brown for main colour. Light Grey would have been so much better.

First try

First try

I mixed the same colours a bit different, and this was the next try.
No, no, even worse!

Second try

Second try

Maybe Dark Blue was better than Purple? And now I was tired of knitting just to unravel again, so remebered this clever method to try out colours.

Light Brown 31, Dark Blue C2, Lavender C9, Coral C18, Light Blue C7, White 10

Light Brown 31, Dark Blue C2, Lavender C9, Coral C18, Light Blue C7, White 10

This is what I ended up with: Light Brown, Dark Brown, Purple C10, Lavender C9 and White. So only 5 different colours since I switched one of the colours in the yoke with my main colour Light Brown.

5 colours

Dark Brown 32, Light Brown 31, Lavender C9, White 10, Purple C10

Finished sweater is a bit lose but very nice in the thin 2-ply Sirri.
I had 15 sts for 10 cm when I knitted in the round, the pattern requires 18 sts, so I had to do a bit of math to adjust the pattern. I started out with 150 stitches instead of 180, very easy math this time ;-).
And 34 sts for the sleeve.

My Aftur Sweater

My Aftur Sweater